**Trail Alerts & Hours (Updated 03/05/2018)**

*Regular Hours:

Unless otherwise indicated below, Cumberland Trail-managed areas are open during daylight hours:

Main Office: M-F 8am – 4:30pm
Laurel-Snow State Natural Area: 8am – 7pm
North Chickamauga Creek Gorge State Natural Area: 7am – 7pm
Head of Sequatchie: 8am – 4:30pm on scheduled days

Vehicles left in gated areas after sunset are subject to being towed or locked in.

*Trail Segment Closures:

Where: Roaring Creek Trailhead (Graysville Mountain) | Trail South
Why: New Trail Bridge Construction. Construction-In-Progress. Unsafe for hiking.
Effective: Immediately
Duration: Indefinite (Until Bridge is Complete)

**Please check back here and the Cumberland Trail State Scenic Trail Facebook page for updates.

**Call our main office for more details: 423-566-2229

 

*upcoming closures (Be Aware):

**Please note: The segments listed below are STILL CURRENTLY OPEN. Once closed, this page will be updated and the closed trail segment listed under the “Trail Segment Closures” listing above. 

Where: North Chickamauga Creek State Natural Area Trailhead
Why: Scheduled Construction.
When: To Be Determined

**Please check back here and the Cumberland Trail State Scenic Trail Facebook page for updates.

**Call our main office for more details: 423-566-2229

 

*Trailwide:

CLOSED: All caves on CT-managed lands are closed due to White-Nose Syndrome. You can read more about this devastating bat disease here: https://www.whitenosesyndrome.org/

CAUTION: Please remain cautious about creek crossings & enjoying creek areas.

The Cumberland Trail is collecting pre-orders to get a specialty license plate started. Makes a great gift! For details, visit: this link

Cumberland Trail Fiddlers’ Showcase

Charlie-McCarroll-1sqCharlie McCarroll is a strong, serious, and powerful fiddler.  At age 74, he continues to play expertly in a style only barely more modern. Since the recent reissue of the classic 1928 recordings of the Roane County Ramblers, Charlie is attracting attention for his own mastery of the repertoire of his father, the great Southern Champion fiddler Jimmy McCarroll.  Charlie says, “Daddy played a little different than me. He never did learn none of that grass.”  Charlie often performs locally with multi-instrumentalist Tony Thomas and has recently earned well-deserved attention on both WBIR’s Heartland Series and WDVX’s Music of the Cumberland Trail.  Even today, as younger players instantly download and scrutinize styles and repertoire from far-flung regions, performers, and time periods, Charlie’s vast storehouse of tunes, earned through diligence, in face-to-face interaction, is beginning to thrill and fascinate followers and students of old-time fiddling.  Though reserved and modest, Charlie bends to no fiddler, remaining ever ready to put his breakneck, hard-driving facilities to the test.

Listen to Charlie McCarroll perform “Green River March” and “Hometown Blues“:

 


Russ-Wilson-2sqAt age 51, Russ Wilson, of Speedwell, is one the youngest musicians in Tennessee to have learned old-time fiddling from a family member. Tutored during annual visits and on a flow of reel-to-reel teaching tapes, young Russ learned almost note-for-note from his masterful third cousin, Fiddlin’ Bob Rogers, who emigrated to Los Angeles where he become a sought-after square dance musician. With his studied, but graceful, style, Russ quickly emerged as an old-time fiddling force. As a teen, Russ traveled to contests throughout the region, frequently besting the competition and eventually earning a fiddle case full of top-tier ribbons. Though nurtured in firmly traditional practices, Russ cultivates a deep curiosity and well-attuned ear to music-making from an array of performers and regions. Along with fiddling, Russ has also developed a distinguishing style on the dobro and flattop guitar. Whatever the instrument, though, of late, he mostly performs the old way, at home, intimately, surrounded by family members and friends. Along with his mother Lou Wilson-herself a regional ballad singing treasure-Russ often welcomes neighbors and visitors to his Powell Valley home place for refreshing afternoons of fiddling, singing, laughter, and conversation. With this flawless rural setting as his “stage,” Russ rarely fiddles in formal performance venues.

Listen to Russ Wilson perform “Buttermilk“:


Bob Douglas

Bob Douglas

Fiddlin’ Bob Douglas‘ of Rhea County, TN was a celebrated musician in the lower end of the Cumberland Trail corridor for over eight decades.  He began his musical career as the guitar accompanist for his father, fiddler Tom Douglas, and the two played for local square dances throughout the Sequatchie Valley region and along the Cumberland Plateau.  After watching his father, Douglas taught himself to play fiddle and landed a job on the first radio station in Chattanooga.

Douglas won several important fiddle contests, beating out professional players such as Clayton McMichen and Bert Layne, of the well-known old time band, Gid Tanner and the Skillet Lickers, at the All-Southern Convention in Chattanooga. When Douglas became a band leader, he hired the two young brothers from Sand Mountain, TN, Ira and Charlie Loudermilk, who became better known as the Louvin Brothers.

Unlike other early country musicians on local radio, Bob Douglas chose to remain a semi-professional in the Chattanooga area rather than tour and turn professional.  He kept his factory job, but played continuously for regional dance, radio programs, and social performances. In 1975 he was invited to participate in a National Fiddle Contest sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.  Douglas won the contest along with his long time partner, guitarist Ray “Georgia Boy” Brown, of Dunlap, Tennessee.

In 2000, Douglas became the first 100-year-old fiddler to play on the Grand Ole Opry. He died at age 101 in 2001.

Listen to Bob Douglas perform “Cotton-Eyed Joe“:

Fiddlin” Bob Rogers

Fiddlin’ Bob Rogers, born in 1907, stood for decades as the premier fiddler from the Powell Valley in Claiborne County, Tennessee. Born into a musical family, Bob, or “Og” as he was known to friends and family, grew up immersed in an environment rich with old-time fiddle music. After learning his first tune, “Maggie,” from his mother, Bob worked as a young man to craft his own beautiful and powerful fiddling style. At his peak, Bob’s refreshing sound reflected a preference for arpeggiation and melodic integrity, relying less, as such, on the droning technique common in much traditional playing. Active in East Tennessee’s music scene until the late 1940s, Bob moved to California in his thirties to work as a welder. Once on the West coast, he also started his own highly successful square dance band and played at various venues, including, most notably, the Crystal Ballroom in Hollywood, CA five nights a week. In 1958, Bob and his band recorded several commercial square dance 78rpms. The records sold so well that venues stopped hiring Bob’s band, relying instead on his popular recordings. Over time, Bob, frustrated with these circumstances, rid himself of any of his own recordings; luckily, though, his second cousin, Lou Wilson, did keep copies dubbed onto several cassette tapes. These survive with her to this day. Bob also made many instructional tapes for his cousin Russ Wilson, the only member of the family to be a direct “student” of this master teacher.

After Bob retired from welding, he spent several weeks each summer visiting and jamming with his friends and relatives back in Speedwell. During these summer shindigs he passed on many of his fiddle licks and tune repertoire–around 700 tunes–to his kinfolks. By the mid-1970s, Bob’s health kept him from traveling to Tennessee. He passed away in the early 1980s. Bob Rogers’s fiddling legacy lives on, though, in the playing of his cousin Russ Wilson and in the lineage of fiddlers in California that were lucky enough to experience his rare encyclopedic knowledge of traditional music.

Listen to Bob Rogers peform “Cumberland Gap“:

(Update: March 2018): Cumberland Trail License Plate

Due to not meeting the funding goal, the Cumberland Trail License Plate campaign has ended.

Updates will be posted here and any previous pre-orders will be honored and/or refunded. Each person who has a pre-order will be contacted individually regarding all possible options. A list is being compiled now and contact will be made soon.

Possible options being discussed are:

  • Transition the current License Plate to a Front Plate (same plate but without the numbers)

  • Refund
  • A Membership to the Friends of the Cumberland Trail
  • Your Suggestion – You Tell Us

Feel free to respond to the above and direct questions to: info@friendsofthecumberlandtrail.org or 423-566-2229

 

 

–Once again an official letter will be mailed/emailed soon–

 

Now Hiring: 2018 Spring & Summer Trail Crew Members!

SPRING & SUMMER 2018 TRAIL CREW POSITIONS – CUMBERLAND TRAIL STATE SCENIC TRAIL – TENNESSEE STATE PARKS

The Cumberland Trail State Scenic Trail is seeking qualified candidates for a Backcountry Crew.

WHEN: A Spring Trail Crew looks to begin in April 2018 and the Summer Crew starting around the week of May 14th through the week of July 27th (10-11 weeks – dates subject to change). Applicants may apply for both seasons or only one.

WHERE: The Trail Crew will be camping & working on the Cumberland Mountain Segment located 40 miles North of Knoxville in Campbell & Claiborne Counties. The Cumberland Trail (CT) will be a 330 mile hiking trail from the Cumberland Gap at the Virginia/Kentucky/Tennessee state corner to Signal Point near Chattanooga. An estimated 100 miles are remaining and you can help us close that gap!

Job Description:

Trail Crew Members will construct new hiking trail, rock steps, and other structures using hand tools and mechanical equipment in this remote area. They must work with others effectively and safely to complete trail construction & maintenance projects. The Trail Crew will share in camp chores each day.

Minimum age: 18

Camping overnight is required.

A full time work week is 37.5 hours.

The weekly schedule:

Day 1 – Arrive at the office, transported to the camp location, set up camp, and trail construction.

Day 2, 3, & 4 – Trail construction

Day 5 – Trail construction, break down camp, and depart for office

The Trail Crew members will also take turns performing the role of camp keeper, maintaining the camp and performing related duties.

*Weekly schedule subject to change due to weather conditions or logistical necessity.

Skills & Abilities:

Aptitude for physical work in the back country; effectively work and communicate with others, comfortable working and living in the backcountry for days at a time.

Wages:

Crew Member positions $9.50/hr.

Other Benefits:

Trail training, use of our camping gear, & we provide the food while camping.

Additional Information and Application:

Mark Stanfill
Cumberland Trail State Scenic Trail

Address: 220 Park Road, Caryville, TN 37714
Email: mark.stanfill@tn.gov
Direct Cell: (615) 574-5176
Main Office: (423) 566-2229 or 423-262-9853

Application Due by April 20, 2018

 

 

Head of Sequatchie 2018 Open Days

The Cumberland Trail State Scenic Trail has announced 2018 open dates for the Head of Sequatchie site.

The Head of Sequatchie site has some of the most beautiful hidden treasures of the Cumberland Trail. To read more about how you can enjoy the Head of Sequatchie, visit this page of FAQs.

  • January 20th
  • February 17th
  • March 24th (Spring Hike)
  • April 21st
  • May 19th
  • June 2nd (National Trails Day)
  • July 21st
  • August 18th
  • September 22nd
  • October 20th
  • November 23rd 
  • December 15th

**Please Note: The dates are subject to change. To ensure availability, check back here or call the Park Office at 423-566-2229.

You may also follow our site on Facebook or follow the Cumberland Trail on Facebook for current updates.

Because of spotty reception in the area, relying on cellphone GPS to find the Head of Sequatchie is not recommended. See this link for thorough driving directions, as well as a map created by GIS specialist, Ranger Jim Brannon.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

DRIVING DIRECTIONS

Laurel-Snow Closure June 12-15th

Laurel-Snow State Natural Area will be closed Monday June 12 through Thursday June 15 while TDOT works on paving the road.  We appreciate your continued patience while we make improvements to the park.

This Week on the Cumberland Trail on WDVX

This week we’ll be coming live from WDVX studios in Clinton, Tennessee to bring you selections from the Sharp family of Fentress County. Documentarian & photographer Rachel Boillot will join us to chat a bit about Evelene Sharp & we’ll play some of Evelene’s home recordings.

The Sharp family music traditions are the subject of a two-volume compilation released by Sandrock Recordings called Sharp’s Hornpipe. You can purchase both volumes on CDBaby.com:

Volume 1: The Fiddling John Sharp Recordings

Volume 2: The Sharp Family Recordings

To listen in, turn your dial to 89.9fm in the greater Knoxville area or visit https://wdvx.com/listen-live/ to listen online.

Notice of Public Meetings

The Cumberland Trail State Scenic Trail will conduct a series of public meetings to share the history of the trail project and present information about upcoming trail construction. Please join us to learn, share, and comment. The Cumberland Trail offers public services and opportunities for citizen to enhance their quality of life. It is imperative that the citizens take part in these meetings to fulfill the intent of the Tennessee State Scenic Trails program.

The Cumberland Trail State Scenic Trail will conduct public meetings on:

Tuesday, May 9, 2017
6:30 – 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time
Spring City Public Library Annex
169 West Rhea Ave. Spring City, TN

Friday, May 12, 2017
6:30 – 8:00 p.m. Central Time
Homestead Harvest Restaurant Cumberland Mountain State Park
Conference Room A
24 Office Dr. Crossville, TN

Monday, May 15, 2017
1:00 – 3:30 p.m. Eastern Time
Rhea County Welcome Center
107 Main St. Dayton, TN

The meetings will discuss the State Park’s intent to submit an application for to the State of Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation for a Land and Water Conservation Fund Grant (LWCF) and to solicit input from the citizens regarding recreational needs within the State Park, State Natural Areas, and State Scenic Trail.

The public is urged to attend. Tennessee State Parks does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, handicap or national origin. The meeting place is handicap accessible. Any person needing special accommodations should contact Cumberland Trail State Scenic Trail (423) 566-2229 prior to each of the above stated time.

CT Privy One – Installed

We’d like to thank Oak Ridge Troop 328 Scout Curtis Robertson for his Eagle Project, installing CT Privy One at the Head of Sequatchie! Curtis brought a crew to perform the work on Saturday, April 29th, and finished just in time to make it to prom!

Thank you Curtis & crew for helping us out with this important milestone!

Eclipse Event – FAQs

Q:How many tickets are available? CAn YOu HOld tickets? Will you have enough for my family/friends? CAn We Buy Tickets on the Day of the Event?

Because of limited parking space, and because we want to keep our programs a reasonable size for our space, only offered 300 paid admissions.

We’ve started a waiting list here. If tickets become available, we’ll offer them to folks on the waiting list by order of registration.

Q: How Will I Know if My tickets Are REserved?

After you complete your PayPal donation, you should be returned to a “Thank You” page on our website. You’ll also receive a confirmation email from PayPal and an email from us.  Check your junk or spam folder, and also add info@friendsofthecumberlandtrail.org to your address list.

If you received a PayPal confirmation, your tickets are reserved, but we want to make sure you’re in the loop as we make event announcements and send instructions via email, so please let us know if you didn’t receive your confirmation from us.  If you haven’t received a notification, get in touch with Marcianne O’Day at the park office marcianne.oday@tn.gov and she will be able to confirm if your tickets are reserved.

Q: How Will I receive My Ticket(s)?

We’re using the term “ticket” loosely. We’ll have staff at the gate checking folks in as they enter the event using a list of those who have paid admission.  Closer to the date, we’ll be sending out an email with more instructions and you can print that and bring it as confirmation. If you’re on the list, you’ll be able to enter and if you’d made your admission donation, you’re on the list.

Q: Where is the Head of Sequatchie?

The Head of Sequatchie is located about 25 minutes from Crossville, Tennessee in Cumberland County.  Cell service is a bit spotty, so make sure to have a look at a map & driving directions in advance.  It’s not hard to find, once you’ve been there, but first-timers who rely on cellphone navigation sometimes get turned around. You can find navigation help here: driving directions, google maps, open street maps.

Q: Is the event pet-friendly?

We love your pets! Please follow normal park rules– leash your pet & be sure to clean up after them.

Q: Is the event KID-friendly?

The entire event is family-friendly and kids under the age of 12 are free with ticketed adult supervision. However, unless specified as a kids program (creek walk, scavenger hunt, kids crafts) our educational programs are designed to appeal to a general audience. Children will be welcome to all the programs, but should be accompanied by an adult who can gauge their interest level and attention span, and help them enjoy the program appropriately.

Q: Can I bring outside food & drinks?

We’ll have food and drink available for sale during the event with proceeds benefiting the trail, but if you have special dietary needs, you’re welcome to bring your own meal & snacks.

Q: What should I bring?

Bring a lawn or camp chair or a picnic blanket, sunscreen, bug spray & a water bottle. We’re expecting it to be hot & humid and we want to make sure everyone is well-hydrated.  If you’ll be going on the hikes, bring some supportive closed-toe shoes as well.

Q: What programs will be offered?

We’re still working out our schedule for the day, but we’ve confirmed that we’ll have live music, ranger-led hikes and a creek program, a photo booth, an introduction to orienteering, native plants, a geology talk, archeology & prehistory, primitive weaponry, Tennessee history, trailbuilding demonstration, scavenger hunt, photography, kids crafts & more to be announced.

Q: What If it’s cloudy? Rainy?

Sadly, we can’t control the weather, but hopefully it will be good!

Even if we can’t view it directly, we’ll be able to observe changes in the natural environment that occur during the eclipse. And, all our programs throughout the day will continue as planned.

In the event of rain, we’ll make modifications and carry on as best we can. If conditions on-site are unsafe, our safety & security officer will make a call and we’ll act according to safety best practices.

Q: Can I Get a Refund? What is your Cancellation Policy?

We can refund on admission donations up until August 11th. This will allow us to offer your tickets to someone on our waiting list. After the 11th, we will have incurred expenses that depend on a specific headcount and we need to make sure we can cover those out of event proceeds.  If you’d like to “re-home” your tickets after the 11th, send us the name of the folks who will be attending in your place (marcianne.oday@tn.gov), and we’ll update your entry on our list at the gate so they can enter and enjoy the festivities.

Along the Trail: News & Information from the Friends of the Cumberland Trail

Along the Trail – March 2017